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Xi’s Ecological Civilization 15 Years On: ‘Lucid Waters And Lush Mountains Are Invaluable Assets’

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I’m Robert Lawrence Kuhn, and here’s what I’m watching: President Xi Jinping’s ecological civilization, 15 years on. It was on August 15, 2005, during his visit to Yucun Village, Anji County, Zhejiang Province, that then-secretary of the CPC Zhejiang Provincial Committee, Xi Jinping, remarked, “We used to say that we wanted lucid waters and lush mountains and that we also wanted mountains of gold and silver. In fact, lucid waters and lush mountains can be as precious as mountains of gold and silver.” Embodying a profound shift in China’s concept and model of development, these remarks constitute a signature statement of Xi’s theory of ecological progress and exemplify his thinking on national governance.

Unless China’s environment is cleaned up, the Chinese Dream cannot be fulfilled. The Chinese nation cannot be rejuvenated if its environment remains massively polluted. The challenge for China is how to motivate individuals and institutions to protect the environment. That’s why, in 2016, I went to Yucun Village, Anji County, located in Zhejiang’s northwestern, mountainous area, which has transformed itself from a polluted mining area into a “green center” of ecology-friendly agriculture, industry and tourism. How did it happen? Can it be emulated?

Here’s the backstory. Between 2003 and 2005, Anji County closed down three mining companies and one cement factory in Yucun, cutting the village’s annual GDP from over three million yuan to about 200,000 yuan, equivalent to less than 30,000 U.S. dollars, a calamitous drop of more than 90 percent. Its residents had to find replacements for their economic loss. Over time, a healthy, natural environment brought new fortune. Locals began making money in an eco-friendly way from the area’s rich resources of bamboo. Today, Yucun stands out as a rural scenic attraction visited by urbanites from Shanghai, Hangzhou and Nanjing. The village has 280 households and a per capita income of about 50,000 yuan or about 7,000 U.S. dollars.

Early in his administration, President Xi elevated “green” to the highest level of national importance, as part of the Five Major Development Concepts. There are three core aspects of Xi’s theory of ecological civilization: First, natural environments are invaluable assets with roots in practice. Second, natural environments reflect a profound shift in China’s concept and model of development. Third, natural environments represent a response to people’s expectations for a better life.

In April of this year, President Xi returned to Yucun village, making the case that care for the environment provides rich economic dividends. “The environment itself means the economy,” he said. “If you protect the environment, you will receive rewards from the environment.”

I’m keeping watch. I’m Robert Lawrence Kuhn.

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The War in the Shadows: Challenges of Fighting Terrorism in Xinjiang | Trailer

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Challenges Of Fighting Terrorism In Xinjiang: The Black Hands

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For years, extremists in and out of Xinjiang have turned to the internet to spread their separatist ideologies. Recruitment and propaganda videos, including some that taught how to make weapons such as explosives, were being uploaded online. To counter this threat, Xinjiang’s internet guardians have been actively scanning the internet for suspicious materials and activities.

This is one of many stories in CGTN’s exclusive documentary “The war in the shadows: Challenges of fighting terrorism in Xinjiang.” Watch the full documentary here.

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The War In The Shadows: Challenges Of Fighting Terrorism In Xinjiang

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Xinjiang, in the far western land of China, hosted one of the world’s first and most important trade routes known as the Silk Road, which linked ancient Chinese civilization to the West through the Eurasian continent.

The land of fortune, however, has not always enjoyed tranquility. Thousands of terrorist attacks from 1990 through 2016 killed large numbers of innocent people and hundreds of police officers. Horrific stabbings and bombings wrecked the land, leaving its people in shock, grief and panic. The damage was incalculable while stability in the region quickly deteriorated. Authorities have been trying hard to restore peace to this land.

In CGTN’s first three documentaries on fighting terrorism in Xinjiang, we presented never-before-seen footage documenting the frightening tragedies in Xinjiang and the resilience of its people.

The fourth exposé “The war in the shadows: Challenges of fighting terrorism in Xinjiang” – the last of the tetralogy – exposes the extremist thinking and the challenges facing China’s efforts to tackle terrorism inside and outside Xinjiang.

It gives answers to these questions: Why has violent terrorism continued to plague Xinjiang? For those who were once known as “Two-faced people” among the legal and political elites in Xinjiang, how much damage have they done to anti-terrorism efforts in the region? How come poisonous education materials alleging ethnic victimization and “Turkic heroes” have been used for 13 years in primary and middle schools? Why must we stop the invisible hand of foreign advocacy abetting violent terrorism infiltrating our country?

The documentary reveals the methods used by extremist and separatist forces including the “Two-faced people” among the region’s high-ranking officials, as well as how music and videos advocating violent terrorism and inciting ethnic hatred penetrated the region. Plus, it also tells of the very hardship police officers have been mired in for decades.

Over the past four years, violence has largely been contained, giving way to rapid urbanization and economic growth. Safety and tranquility never come easy. But it’s only a preliminary victory in China’s fight against terrorism.

The documentary is 55 minutes long and consists of four parts: “The network,” “Enemies within,” “The textbooks,” and “The black hands.”

We present you with the first three documentaries — each under an hour — below.

Watch: Fighting terrorism in Xinjiang

Watch: The black hand — ETIM and terrorism in Xinjiang

Watch: Tianshan: Still standing – Memories of fighting terrorism in Xinjiang

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