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Why China Hasn’t Forgotten About The War Against Japanese Aggression

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China is still remembering it, 75 years on since the end of the war.

Earlier on Thursday (September 3), Chinese President Xi Jinping, also general secretary of the Communist Party of China (CPC) Central Committee and chairman of the Central Military Commission (CMC), went to a museum in the suburb of Beijing to commemorate the anniversary.

After a minute of silence mourning the fallen heroes, Xi, along with other leaders of the CPC Central Committee, laid wreaths for the martyrs.

Speaking at a symposium later in the day with the presence of veterans who survived the war, Xi hailed the Chinese nation’s great spirit, stressing patriotism and heroism in the effort to achieve China’s national rejuvenation.

He said the Chinese nation as a whole fought and won the war with great spirits of patriotism and heroism, which is invaluable today and can motivate the Chinese people to overcome all difficulties and obstacles and strive to achieve national rejuvenation.

The COVID-19 pandemic has sent the already strained China-U.S. relations on a rapid downward spiral.

Despite fast and effective control of the epidemic in China, the U.S. has constantly attacked China over its handling of coronavirus. In recent months, the U.S. government has also escalated attacks on the CPC, viewing it as a “global threat and enemy.”

Under the CPC’s leadership, the Chinese people have not only won the war against Japanese fascism but made remarkable achievements in economic and social developments since then, Xi highlighted in the symposium.

China’s reform and opening-up have completely overhauled its economy, urbanized society and improved living standards. China is now the second-largest world economy following the U.S., and before the end of 2020, it will lift all people out of poverty.

To achieve China’s national rejuvenation, Xi said the country must stick to the leadership of the CPC, the path of socialism with Chinese characteristics, the people-centric approach as well as peaceful development.

“The Chinese people will never agree with any one or any force that attempts to distort the history of the CPC and stigmatize the nature of the CPC,” Xi said.

“The Chinese people will never agree with anyone or any force that attempts to distort and divert the path of socialism with Chinese characteristics and attempt to deny and stigmatize the great achievement under the path. The Chinese people will never agree with anyone or any force that attempts to split the CPC and the Chinese people.”

He also rejected the attempts to bully and impose their will on China as well as hinder Chinese people’s communication with people in other countries.

Little-known facts about the scale of war in China

It’s important to remember the suffering and loss of World War II, but one must not forget the war in China in extent, consequences and legacy.

People from all across the country found themselves embroiled in the Chinese People’s War of Resistance Against Japanese Aggression (1931-1945).

China was the main battlefield against Japanese fascism. Before the Pacific War (1941-1943), Japan deployed about 80-94 percent of its troops in China, and after 1941, Japan still kept over 50 percent of its soldiers in China.

When Japan surrendered, a total of 1.86 million Japanese troops were deployed in China, accounting for nearly 52 percent of the total number of combatants sent abroad.

During the war over 1.5 million Japanese troops died in China, while more than 35 million Chinese military and civilians died during the war, accounting for nearly 8 percent of China’s total population in 1928.

China says it suffered more than 100 billion U.S. dollars of direct economic losses and 500 billion U.S. dollars of indirect economic losses (at the price in 1937).

Opportunity for reflection

In the past decades, China’s relations with Japan have experienced ups and downs.

During the Osaka meeting last June, leaders of both countries reached a 10-point consensus to jointly promote a healthy development of bilateral relations. Xi also agreed in principle to pay a state visit to Japan, which was interrupted by the COVID-19, turning a new page on ties between the two countries.

China and Japan are close neighbors, and a long-term peaceful relationship benefits people from both countries, as well as the stability of Asia and the world, Xi said while reflecting on the war.

Properly reflecting on Japanese fascism and its aggression and invasion to China is an important political foundation of the establishment and growth of the China-Japan relations, Xi said.

We should take the opportunity to remember and reflect on history as we cherish peace and friendship between the two

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WHO Spokesperson Reveals Details Of Its Expert Team Visit To Wuhan

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Even as vaccines are rolled out, COVID-19 continues to ravage the world, having caused nearly 2 million deaths. The situation is in dire need of stronger global cooperation. That spirit can be at least reflected by the latest World Health Organization (WHO) expert team’s visit to China which will start in Wuhan, where the first cases of infections in China were reported.

“This is about understanding what happened so that the world can be better equipped as the world to prevent it happening again,” said WHO spokesperson Margaret Harris in an exclusive interview with CGTN host Tian Wei. She stressed that the field trip is “not about finding someone to blame. Let’s leave the politics out of it.”

Dr. Harris revealed that preparations about the mission started last October. There were a few virtual meetings held since then. This trip will be about a wide variety of subjects related to the discovery research of the origins of COVID-19. While no quick answers are expected.

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The WHO team of 10 experts from 10 different countries are expected to visit the Chinese city Wuhan, where cases of infections were first reported at the end of 2019. Yet later discoveries found the presence of the virus in Spain, Italy and the U.S., demonstrating how much is still unknown about the virus.

While the world is bogged down by this pandemic, there appear a few COVID-19 vaccine candidates that have been developed at unprecedented speed. But that very fact has made people uneasy: was it developed too fast? Are those vaccines trustworthy?

“People should be concerned about the safety issues,” noted Dr. Harris, but she explained that one thing that has really slowed down vaccine development in the past was getting the funding for the studies, and this time that part got ample support.

Harris said that only after very careful review of data on issues of safety and efficacy, and visiting manufacturing factories, would the WHO put a vaccine on its Emergency Use Listing (EUL). So far only the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine received the validation at the end of last year, but more announcements could be made as soon as in the next few weeks, according to Harris. Among those are candidates coming from Sinopharm and Sinovac, two Chinese vaccine developers.

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The COVAX program was set up by the WHO with GAVI, the vaccine alliance, to help distribute vaccines to more countries. China joined COVAX last year.

Out of the 42 countries that are rolling out COVID-19 vaccines, 36 are high-income countries and six middle-income countries. “So there’s a clear problem that low- and most middle-income countries are not receiving the vaccine yet,” said WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus earlier this month.

“We are not happy that it’s not happening quickly enough,” said Harris, “but we determined to make it happen.”

World Insight with Tian Wei is an international platform for debate and intelligent discussion. It is the meeting point of both the highly influential and rising voices, facilitated by host Tian Wei. It provides nutrition to form your own thoughts and ideas through a 45-minute live debate and interviews.

Schedule: Monday-Saturday

Time (GMT): 1415, 2015

(If you want to contribute and have specific expertise, please contact us at opinions@cgtn.com.)

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AIIB Fifth Anniversary Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank Celebrates Fifth Anniversary With Eye On Green Post-Pandemic Recovery

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The Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, known as the AIIB, is celebrating its fifth anniversary. Today, the organization has doubled the number of members it had when it launched in Beijing back in 2016, making it the second largest of all multilateral banks. In the face of new global challenges, not least of all COVID-19, the AIIB is currently undergoing a transformation. Feng Yilei has more.

The Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank is re-thinking its strategy, from financing traditional infrastructure, to looking ahead to the future.

The international development bank has identified key emerging infrastructure trends that will drive the future of investment in previously overlooked areas.

The new focus? Infrastructure that is green and human-centred, with an eye on technology while enhancing connectivity.

The shift takes place in the context of COVID-19, which experts say has exposed weaknesses in infrastructure of many economies.

JIN LIQUN President of AIIB “At this juncture, it is important to point out that efforts to foster our health system as well as address climate change can no longer be dealt with in silence. We need to promote the intricate emerging pattern of the relationship between climate and health care problems. Rebooting the global economy will require that we no longer tackle challenges in isolation.”

The AIIB’s plans are laid out in its “Next-10-year Corporate Strategy” which establishes clear priorities and ambitious targets in its overall share of financing-50 percent for climate action by 2025, 25 to 30 percent for cross-border connectivity by 2030, and 50 percent for private sector operations by 2030.

In the medium-to-long term, the bank’s next chapter includes not just expanding into social infrastructure, but also ramping up investment in digital infrastructure, especially in less-developed regions.

JIN LIQUN President of AIIB “New infrastructure development boosted by new technologies will bring for immediate benefits and pay off in the long term. Global trade will eventually open up, and those countries who invest smartly would be ready to capitalize on those opportunities. Indeed, there will be, in my view, and overhaul of the existing structure to meet the needs of the digital era.”

As global policy makers struggle with the current global health crisis and its immediate aftermath, experts say it is imperative for multilateral development banks, such as the AIIB, to work with the private sector to mobilize much needed investment.

They say a key challenge is to leverage more international capital from the private sector or commercial banks that eye returns.

JIN LIQUN President of AIIB “To a certain extent, it’s not so easy to find common ground, but it’s possible. Private sector investors may not necessarily look at the highest returns when they know that by working with MDBs, actually, they have safety of their resources. And also with enhanced responsibility, they would love to work with MDBs.”

FENG YILEI Beijing “Over the past half a decade, the president of the AIIB says he has witnessed the progress in terms of how development bank operates, including its policies, regulations, staffing and institutional environment.”

Challenges brought about by the pandemic have accelerated change in the overall development of multilateral development banks. The AIIB says it has gained critical experience and the opportunity to further evolve its business model, to play a central role in the stability of global finance. Feng Yilei, CGTN, Beijing.

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What Drives China’s Success In 2020?

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factors driving China’s success in its epic battle against COVID-19 pandemic and poverty last year.

‘People first’

Under Xi’s command, the constant theme of China’s war against coronavirus has been “people first.”

“The people’s safety and health always come first, and thus the prevention and control of the outbreak is the country’s most important work for now,” said Xi on his meeting with visiting World Health Organization (WHO) Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus last January.

Stressing CPC is the most reliable backbone for Chinese people in times of trouble, Xi ordered the use of the entire country’s resources to tackle the pandemic, which is also an advantage of China’s socialist system.

As a result, China has emerged among the first countries to contain the virus, reopen the economy safely, and restore economic growth. The country’s GDP is expected to exceed 100 trillion yuan (about $15.38 trillion) in 2020, with per capita GDP reaching $10,000.

Meanwhile, China has sent 36 medical expert teams to 34 countries and offered help for 150 countries and 10 international organizations to fight the virus, echoing President Xi’s call for building a community of common health for mankind.

The COVID-19 vaccine will be made a global public good, which will be China’s contribution to ensuring vaccine accessibility and affordability in developing countries, Xi announced in May at the opening of the 73rd session of the World Health Assembly.

‘No one should be left behind’

On November 23, as southwest China’s Guizhou Province cleared all the names on its poverty list, China had eradicated absolute poverty and regional poverty.

At a symposium on securing a decisive victory in poverty alleviation in March, Xi said lifting all rural residents living below the poverty line out of poverty by 2020 is a solemn promise made by the CPC Central Committee and it must be fulfilled on time.

Xi put poverty relief center in front of his governance and spent the most energy on it. During his domestic inspections last year, Xi often went to the frontline to supervise poverty relief efforts.

“No one should be left behind on the road of socialism,” Xi said in May. “Everyone should be on the path toward a moderately prosperous society in all respects and common prosperity.”

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